Consultation display

Who gets remembered in public spaces?

Purpose of the consultation

The Culture, Welsh Language and Communications Committee is undertaking an inquiry into who gets remembers in public places.

 

The Welsh Government has commissioned an audit of statues, street and building names to address Wales’ connections with the slave trade. The Culture, Welsh Language and Communications Committee of the Welsh Parliament is carrying out a separate piece of work looking at how society determines who should be commemorated in public spaces  and when individual instances of commemoration – such as statues, monuments or street names - should be removed, or changed, to reflect contemporary views.

 

The Committee is therefore not looking at the rights and wrongs of individual instances, such as statues or street names. Instead, it is looking for views on what principles should be used to decide who is commemorated, and what process should be followed if people want individual instances to be removed or changed.

 

The Committee feels it is important that there is a process for public authorities to use to determine who gets remembered in public spaces. This way people can understand why decisions have been made, and have the opportunity to challenge decisions they do not agree with.

 

The Committee is interested on your views on:

 

  • What principles should be followed when public authorities decide who should be remembered in public spaces? How should they consider issues such as:

 

-         The historical significance of the person,

-         The continued influence of this person,

-         The national impact of this person,

-         His /her Impact on his/her field,

-         How this person was viewed at the time,

-         Whether this person provides a good example to people today,

-         The architectural significance of the monument,

-         The impact on minority groups and views of the act of commemoration.

 

  • Should the appropriateness of acts of public commemoration be judged against fixed criteria (as, for example, is the case with listed buildings)?

 

  •  What process should public authorities follow when deciding whether to remove or transfer a statue or monument or rename a place? How should local people be engaged in this process?

 

  • The planning system allows for local people to input into a decision made by a local planning authority, which makes a decision based on a common set of rules. How appropriate would a similar system be for dealing with controversial acts of public commemoration?

 

·         If statues or monuments are judged to be inappropriate, to what extent is it suitable to re-contextualise them (for example, by providing additional information on a plaque) rather than remove them?

 

  • If statues or monuments are judged to be inappropriate, to what extent is it suitable to re-contextualise them (for example, by providing additional information on a plaque) rather than remove them?

 

  • If historic statues or monuments are taken down, what should be done with them?

 

  • Are there any international examples of governments dealing effectively with controversial historical acts of public commemoration?

 

  • Are there any individuals or groups of people that are underrepresented in public commemoration in Wales?

 

How to respond:

Please write to us with your response by emailing  seneddCWLC@senedd.wales

 

Closing Date: 26 October 2020

Contact details

Should you wish to speak to someone regarding this consultation, please use the below contact details:

Culture, Welsh Language and Communications Committee
Welsh Parliament
Cardiff Bay
Cardiff
CF99 1SN

Email: SeneddCWLC@senedd.wales
Telephone: 0300 200 6565

 

 

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